Catching on to fishy lookalike cousins

Something Fishy | Catching on to look-alike cousins

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CLUED UP: Maddie Harrigan knows a tarwhine when she sees one. She caught this one at Shoal Bay.

CLUED UP: Maddie Harrigan knows a tarwhine when she sees one. She caught this one at Shoal Bay.

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Can you pick the differences between bream and tarwhine?

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Four-year-old Shoal Bay Beach champion Maddie Harrigan, who doesn’t like holding slimy fish, proudly displays her bream caught off the beach.

Hang on .. on closer inspection, Maddie’s bream isn’t a bream!

It’s a tarwhine.

Can you pick the differences?

The tarwhine, which can grow to 80 centimetres long, has a flatter nose, golden lines along the sides and a black inner lining.

The close cousin of the bream, the tarwhine can be found over reefs, in estuaries and along beaches on the south east and south west coasts of Australia.

Mistaken as a bream by just about everyone, the tarwhine is counted as a bream in your Fisheries daily bag limit. 

Five tarwhine and five bream equal 10 bream – if you get what I mean.

Elsewhere around the port the crabs are still going crackers with blue swimmers doing the hokey pokey from Taylors Beach to Karuah.

The past three crab seasons have been fantastic with both muddies and blue swimmers in excellent numbers.

Luderick and bream are settling in for winter along the Nelson Bay breakwall.

Daily bag limits are set, which means that you cannot legally catch your limit of 10 fish in the morning and return to catch another 10 in the afternoon.

For more information visit dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing

John ‘Stinker’ Clarke

The story Catching on to fishy lookalike cousins first appeared on Port Stephens Examiner.

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